Wednesday, December 9, 2009

SkyDrive finally gets integration with Windows Explorer

When Sky Drive first came out from Microsoft I was really excited but alas there was no integration from Windows Explorer thus the intresst quickly faded, until today when I needed to share a binary file without having to require people to be registered and invited to my shared folder (which I need if I where to use my DropBox account) and to my suprise this was no issue at all for SkyDrive.

But still I was missing the windows explorer integration so I decided to give it one more go and boy am I glad that I did since it lead to the discovery of the excellent and FREE tool SkyDrive Explorer.

Screenshot of integration SkyDrive with Windows Explorer

Screenshot of accessing a folder on SkyDrive from Windows Explorer

Installing WPF Toolkit June 2009 on Windows 7 (getting rid of the heinous "WPF Toolkit requires .NET Framework 3.5 SP1")

Lately I've started to try out Windows 7 on my main development machine at work, this has worked really well and I'm really loving the Windows 7 experience... However there is always a darkside to everything, apparently the version of .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 that comes bundled with Windows 7 has a different version number than the regular download and thus you will bump into the following type of errors:



Imaging my frustration when googling around for this and not finding anything particularly useful (it's a rather annoying error message given the fact that it isn't correct since .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 is on the machine). Anyway after some email correspondance with a friend and colleague (thanks Samuel) my attention was turned to the Microsoft Platform SDK which contains a little tool called "Orca" which let's you inspect and modify the tables in an .msi file.

If you don't want to install the whole platform SDK you can grab the setup for "Orca" from my sky drive.


Now for the magic, to get around the error message we need to nuke the launch condition in question from the .msi file (there might be an easier way todo this so feel free to correct me by leaving a comment):



Step 1, Launch Orca.
Step 2, Open the .msi package.
Step 3, Find & select the launch condition entry in the navigation pane.
Step 4, Select NETFX35SP1_INSTALLED in the details pane & right click.
Step 5, From the context menu select drop row.
Step 6, Confirm the removal of the launch condition.
Step 7, Save the .msi package.
Step 8, Run the .msi package and voila no more error message.

Installing WCF LOB SDK SP2 on Windows 7 (getting rid of the heinous "WCF LOB Adapter SDK requires .NET Framework 3.5 SP1")

Lately I've started to try out Windows 7 on my main development machine at work, this has worked really well and I'm really loving the Windows 7 experience... However there is always a darkside to everything, apparently the version of .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 that comes bundled with Windows 7 has a different version number than the regular download and thus you will bump into the following type of errors:



Imaging my frustration when googling around for this and not finding anything particularly useful (it's a rather annoying error message given the fact that it isn't correct since .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 is on the machine). Anyway after some email correspondance with a friend and colleague (thanks Samuel) my attention was turned to the Microsoft Platform SDK which contains a little tool called "Orca" which let's you inspect and modify the tables in an .msi file.

If you don't want to install the whole platform SDK you can grab the setup for "Orca" from my sky drive.


Now for the magic, to get around the error message we need to nuke the launch condition in question from the .msi file (there might be an easier way todo this so feel free to correct me by leaving a comment):



Step 1, Launch Orca.
Step 2, Open the .msi package.
Step 3, Find & select the launch condition entry in the navigation pane.
Step 4, Select the ISWCFINSTALLED entry in the details pane & right click.
Step 5, From the context menu select drop row.
Step 6, Confirm the removal of the launch condition.
Step 7, Save the .msi package.
Step 8, Run the .msi package and voila no more error message.

Sunday, December 6, 2009

TFS Administration Tool Version 2.0 CTP now available for download

Finally it’s time for the brand new design of the tool to see the light, you can download the v2.0 CTP from here. Please take it for a spin and let us know what you like and not like about it (along with any potential problems you have).

The main new features in this release are:

  • Support for all available versions of Team Foundation Server (2005, 2008, 2010 Beta 2)
  • Complete redesign of the user interface
  • Multiple server connection
  • Bulk edit of users
  • Undo pending changes
  • Tracing

You can read more about the release on the homepage:

We are pleased to announce that the first community tech preview of TFS Administration Tool 2.0 has been released. This CTP marks a new beginning for the TFS Administration Tool as we have almost completely redesigned and rewritten the tool

The purpose for this rewrite was to provide a more stable and intuitive user experience.

Shortly we will start posting some walk through guides for common tasks.

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

Hans Rosling predicts the future ... When & How will Asia regain it's dominace over the world market?

Hans Rosling recently held a talk at TEDIndia about when Asia (India and China in particular) will catch up with the west and become the leading force in the economic world market. As usual he is very amusing to listen to and the stats he presents makes you think about the big picture as usual.

Hans Rosling: Asia's rise -- how and when

And while your at it make sure you watch some of his previous talks as well:

Hans Rosling: Let my dataset change your mindset
Hans Rosling on HIV: New facts and stunning data visuals
Hans Rosling's new insights on poverty
Hans Rosling shows the best stats you've ever seen

A fun note on the side is that when I sat down in the couch and opened up my laptop to write this post, I turned on the telly and guess what? It's a program with Hans Rosling on the Swedish television. Now that can't be just coincidence :)